Saturday, March 21, 2015

Local laws, etiquette and tips

Smoking is banned in all public places, which includes beaches and parks.
Tipping isn’t a huge deal in Hong Kong – in taxis, for example, you can just round up the fare – except in restaurants, where it’s customary to add a further five per cent to the bill. ‘Service charges’, scandalously, tend not to go to servers.
When planning trips on ferries or to popular sights, it's worth checking the Hong Kong Government Gazette (gov.hk/en/about/abouthk/holiday) to try and avoid travelling on public holidays.
Hong Kong city guide
You’ll be dazzled, exasperated and overwhelmed – but never bored.
AP
If you have a cold, it’s considered polite, but not obligatory, to wear a facemask so don’t be alarmed by their ubiquity in winter. Cough etiquette hints are posted on some of the buses and hand sanitisers are available in the shopping malls.
Even if you’re not on business, there’s probably going to be an occasion when someone will produce a name card. Receive it with both hands, read it and treat it respectfully. In the same way, when you’re handing over a credit card, it’s polite to use both hands.
English is not as widely spoken as you might expect in a former British colony. Always carry the Chinese address of where you’re staying and where you’re going.
Be aware of the concept of ‘face’. Don’t persist, for example, in asking directions from someone who is clearly not at ease with English. And try not to ask questions (e.g. “Is this the way to the Star Ferry?”) which can be answered by ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. People wishing to save your face will say ‘Yes’, whether or not that’s right.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Twitter Delicious Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Favorites More

 
Design by Free WordPress Themes | Bloggerized by Lasantha - Premium Blogger Themes | GreenGeeks Review